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#HOMESWEETHOME features: where they live

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016 | T: lamono

For some people, it’s hard to stay in one place. It’s all about physics: if your head is on the clouds, the ground stands too far below. Feeling at home is not the same as feeling safe, it has more to do with feeling good with yourself; the way you feel when you close your eyes. Then, what’s home about? With that question in mind we decided to travel to the capital of dissatisfaction, the place with the highest ratio of people chasing dreams per squared meter: New York City. There we visited the homes of three alumni who are clearly ahead of the curve, they belong to that new generation of emerging artists with overflowing talent, decided to take over the world while establishing the current artistic scenario: Jason Brad Yarmosky, Chad Moore and Amanda Jasnowski Pascual. Throughout this journey, they introduced us to far more than just the space between walls where they inhabit -and create-, they also opened the doors to their story; the home where they grew up in and the place they dream about when they close their eyes. Because every time we wish for something intently, we close our eyes. Like when we kiss somebody, or blow the candles of our birthday cake. That’s because the gesture of closing our eyes has the power of transporting us straight to the present, to the here and now, a place distant from fear, without a tinge of FOMO, because we are exactly where we want to be, doing precisely what we want to do; it can be more or less sweet, but that’s where true home lies. T: Xavi Ocaña / F: Carla Tramullas

www.jasonyarmosky.com

chad-moore.com

www.amandajas.com

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JASON BARD YARMOSKY

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For some people, it’s hard to stay in one place. It’s all about physics: if your head is on the clouds, the ground stands too far below. Feeling at home is not the same as feeling safe, it has more to do with feeling good with yourself; the way you feel when you close your eyes. Then, what’s home about? With that question in mind we decided to travel to the capital of dissatisfaction, the place with the highest ratio of people chasing dreams per squared meter: New York City. There we visited the homes of three alumni who are clearly ahead of the curve, they belong to that new generation of emerging artists with overflowing talent, decided to take over the world while establishing the current artistic scenario: Jason Brad Yarmosky, Chad Moore and Amanda Jasnowski Pascual. Throughout this journey, they introduced us to far more than just the space between walls where they inhabit -and create-, they also opened the doors to their story; the home where they grew up in and the place they dream about when they close their eyes. Because every time we wish for something intently, we close our eyes. Like when we kiss somebody, or blow the candles of our birthday cake. That’s because the gesture of closing our eyes has the power of transporting us straight to the present, to the here and now, a place distant from fear, without a tinge of FOMO, because we are exactly where we want to be, doing precisely what we want to do; it can be more or less sweet, but that’s where true home lies.

When do you think of home, the first image that comes to your mind is the house were you currently live or the one where you grew up in? The home I grew up in.

In New York apartment-hunting can be very close to any extreme sport. Was this apartment hard to find? The neighborhood has changed over the past four years a lot. I think it would be harder today.

Did you bring a lot of stuff from your former home? Yeah. I also tend to fall into category of a hoarder so I try to get rid of things that I don’t need or not acquire so many things. But I think the things that over the years I’ve caught maybe a piece of furniture that is special for me, or some books. I like a lot of old things, besides from my subject matter on my art.

Your grandparents are one of the main inspirations for your artwork. Would you have them as roommates? They are a lot of fun. I’ve stay with them a lot over time so I know what it’s like to live with them. It was pretty cool.

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How was your childhood with them? I grow up with them and my parents. We were all very close. They weren’t a replacement of my parents they were an addition. It was fun growing up with them. They have such a great sense of humor. Charles Chaplin or Woody Allen… We used to watch all these movies.

Is there a particular song or smell that makes you feel to the house where you grew up in? Mozart Clarinet Concerto. My grandfather used to play the clarinet. When I was a kid my oldest most fun memory I think of staying over in the house was they had a big house. I remember coming downstairs, to the kitchen, when I was a kid and I remember always listening the sound of coffee beans grinding and Mozart playing loud. I kind of have a ritual when I get up, making coffee and playing Mozart. That makes me feel like home.

Looking at your artwork it is obvious that you are very close to your grandparents, can we see that connection in your home? Do you have things that belonged to them or they gave you as a gift? A lot of things, most of the things. I have for example this old picture of my grandparents, my grandfather’s lighter… I have some books from him like this one from the Marx Brothers, photo albums with family pictures…

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Do you think it’s important to get away from where you’ve grown up? Yes and no. I think it’s important to be aware of the rest of the world but also hold home close to your self. For me the idea of home is a very personal connection. My art comes from something very personal. My family is part of my work. Staying here sometimes it can be a good thing. There’s never been a lack of inspiration for me here so as long as that’s the case I don’t see myself having to leave.

Do you think for an artist there’s a connection between his art and the fact of feeling home? The psychological meaning behind the word “home” is a powerful platform for exploration in my art.

Do you create at home or have a studio? My studio is also my home.

Do you have a part of the house or any activity that helps you to free your mind in order to come up with ideas? There’s no one specific place but I have my rituals. I put on a few lights and it’s not too bright to create a mood ambiance or burning palo santo.

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What’s your favorite part of your apartment? The rooftop.

What’s the best memory you’ve lived in your current apartment? I have so many great memories here that It would be hard to pick a specific one.

Do you cook at home? I would love to know how many people say yes to that question in New York. I do sometimes. I have the set up. I’m good at scrambled eggs at breakfast time.

If there was a fire and you were force to leave really quick, what would you take with you? Maybe my hard drive that I still try to put together. If everything I’ve done with my art could be there. Hopefully there’s no fire.

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Your artwork explores the meaning of aging. How is the house where you see yourself growing older? I think I would like to build a place upstate somewhere more in the country. I like the idea of having the duality of having the city and also having some outlet that is more connected to nature.

If you could have any artwork in the world in your home, which one would it be? As I change the answer to this question changes. One year it would have been Caravaggio or the next a Bacon or a Kiefer. I think right now I would want a Rothko.

Which artist (dead or alive) do you think it would be fun to have as roommate? I would have to say Dali has an appeal.

Stephen King said once “home is where you dance with others.” In your own words, what would be your definition of feeling home? Home for me is where I feel most myself. Ultimately my biggest home is within, my body, where I am internally as an individual. Because no matter how many people you know or are in your life, at the end of the day when you go to sleep, when you wake up that’s alone.

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Throughout this journey, they introduced us to far more than just the space between walls where they inhabit -and create-, they also opened the doors to their story

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CHAD MOORE 

If there’s one quintessential representative of what it means to be young, here and today, in planet Earth, that’s photographer Chad Moore (1987). His snaps capture the singularity of youth like no one can, yours, mine, the neighbor’s, the one many wished to have lived; friendship, parties, sex, runaways, spontaneity, egotism and the pleasure of knowing no boundaries. Chad was born in Tampa, Florida; on the 24th of September 2008 he jumped on a train and moved to New York. After a long ride –“when you travel by train there’s no such thing as excess baggage”-, he landed on a friend’s couch in Williamsburg, in a time when you couldn’t even find a supermarket there. Many rolls of film have been developed since, exhibitions all over the world (New York, London, Paris, Amsterdam…) and even a book of his own, the essential Anyone In Love With You (Already Knows). It’s been a little bit over nine months since he and his dog, Stella, have been living in “one of the last great places in New York”, Chinatown. A high ceiling studio he transformed (with the help of his friends) into home. “A lot of people look for a nice bedroom; I rather have a big empty space where I can shoot”. Amongst his neighbors is sir Ryan McGinley; besides being his friend, he also worked for him as assistant. His photographs supply graphic evidence that demonstrates youth is not about form, but a concept, is not significant, but meaningful, and, of course, his house is a clear reflection of it

When you think about home, the first image that comes to your mind is the house where you currently live in or the one where you grew up? This place, New York.

In New York apartment-hunting can be very close to any extreme sport. Was this apartment hard to find? Yes. No one ever leaves from this building. It’s fairly cheap and when you have a commercial space set up, you don’t want to leave. It’s hard to find. As you know, an apartment in NYC with high ceilings. A lot of people don’t like Chinatown but I kind of like it because it’s one of the last great places in New York. I get inspired by the neighborhood surroundings.

What is important for you when looking for an apartment? What made you chose this one? High ceilings and having a space where I can shoot. A lot of people look for a nice bedroom, I rather have a big empty space.

Did you bring a lot of stuff from your previous home? I have a lot of stuff. I’m very sentimental. I save everything, which I’m trying to get better at. I have t-shirt that I’ve saved from when I was sixteen. I put everything in a storage but I still have a lot of stuff. When you have a storage you realize all the stuff that you don’t use, I never go there to get anything I just have all those stuff.

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In your photographs we can see your friends living in a really free and intense way, having fun, fearless. Would you have any of them as roommates? Depends on which ones. I like being alone. Some of the people of my pictures I’ve lived with.

By looking at your pictures, people can assume that your house is like an ongoing party. Are you the type of person who likes to have people over visiting or are you more the type he likes his home to be a place where finding some peace of mind and rest? The places where I’ve used to live I use to have a lot of people over. But now that I’m older I don’t wanna clean up after. You know everyone comes over and everybody is drinking and smoking but no one is gonna clean on their way out. Then you just wake up and you are like: fuck. I like to be alone, yeah. This is my bubble where I hide from the world.

Your friends are especially important since they are part of your work. Are they as present in your home as they are in your work? If we look around your apartment would we found lots of stuff from them: gifts, souvenirs…? Yes, I have so many books and magazines that they made me, really cool birthday cards made with photoshop…

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Is there a particular song that makes you feel to the house where you grew up in? Seven Spanish Angels by Willie Nelson

And a food or smell? I think the smell of Lilies, they’re my moms favorite flower and we always had them in my house growing up- and now I buy them for mine.

Do you cook at home? Not really. It’s so much cheaper to eat out. I wanna say that I’m good cooking.

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Do you have your own artwork hanging on the walls of your home? Mostly just proving. I think it’s kind of weird to hang out your own pictures.

Do you think it’s important to get away from where you’ve grown up? Why? Definitely. Anything I could do in Tampa was done. I wanted more.

Do you create at home or have a studio? This is also my studio. For me taking pictures is just 10% of the job. Thinking about the pictures and dealing with them is 90%.

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What’s your favorite part of the house? The red door.

Do you have artwork from someone else? Ryan McGingley, Jack Walls, a really cool painter. I just got a photo Zóltan Jókay.

Do you ever feel like living it all behind and live on the road or going somewhere else to start from scratch? Yes, definitely. Before I got this place I was thinking of moving maybe to Paris for a few months. If you can’t find a really good place in NYC, it sucks. I don’t know if I could leave everything behind though, it would probably be in a storage unit. I love the idea of it though. I just don’t know I could. I feel it’s a different type of person. I could leave New York, I like the idea, but I don’t know where I would go. I don’t like LA at all. London is kind of weird. I’m not good at relaxing.

What’s the best memory you’ve lived in this house? I met my girlfriend here. I was photographing her for this magazine. Sounds super cliché. But I’ll say she asked me out.

If there was a fire and you were force to leave really quick, what would you take with you? This wood watermelon. My granddad made it. I never met him, he died the year before I was born.

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When was the moment when you felt like: I’m home? When I got a couch.

How is the house where you see yourself growing older? I would love it to be in New York. A big loft or a brown stone in the East Village.

If you could have any artwork in the world in your home, which one would it be? I think I want to be surrounded by Marc Hundley posters and Zoltan Jokay photographs.

Which artist do you think it would be fun to have as roommate? Jack Walls

Stephen King said once “home is where you dance with others.” In your own words, what would be your definition of feeling at home? I love Stephen King. I think home is where you can dance by yourself.

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AMANDA JASNOWSKI PASCUAL

Many people know Amanda Jasnowski Pascual (1992), even if they are not aware of it. This photographer, born in Spain of a Valencian mother and raised in Ohio, is the creator of images full of color and textures, where the protagonists hide from the camera through unusual compositions. It’s impossible for these snaps to go unnoticed, much less be forgotten. That might be why, at her early twenties, her work has found abode in prestigious galleries around the world, New York, Los Angeles and London to name a few cities, and amongst her client list names like The New Yorker, Nike, adidas, and a long etcetera, arise. “I never wanted to live anywhere else as much as I want to live in New York”. It’s been a little bit over four years since she packed her dreams, said goodbye to her hometown and moved to the Big Apple. Currently she lives in a charming (it couldn’t be any other way) apartment in Bedstuy (Brooklyn), her “favorite neighborhood” from all the ones where she has lived in. She pays rent and shares the flat with another girl and two cats. For her, “home is a sacred place”, and us, after spending an afternoon in it, became true devotees.

When you think about home, the first image that comes to your mind is the house where you currently live in or the one where you grew up? The one(s) I grew up in.

The use of color is very present in your work, the same thing happens in your house? Definitely. The sensibility towards color you can appreciate in my work is reflected in the way I live my life and how I decide to exist in a specific space. Years ago I made the decision that the work I do for “work” and the one I do personally, could coexist in a pacific manner.

Born in Spain and raised in Ohio. What does your home conveys about each of these two worlds? I think there are more things related to Spain than to Ohio. Nostalgic knick-knacks. More than objects, you can see it in the small traditions that I have kept on practicing: Sundays off and big meals, coffee after lunch and, every now and then, a ‘siesta’.

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What do you remember the most about your childhood in Spain? I remember all my beloved ones, the plaza where we used to play every day, our school uniforms, lunchtime at school, the Kinder eggs. The house I grew up in was big and clunky, and it always smelled a little bit to musk and cold. Big wood beams lined the ceilings.

Did growing up in a rural town like Ohio influence your definition of home? Not necessarily. Ohio has offered a location to that definition. It has endowed a feeling with an image. I’m not too sure if that which is natural to you, it is also for the person who nurtures you. America’s mid-west is a calm and stable place.

Is there any particular song that makes you think about the house you grew up in? Spanish Christmas carols and nineties pop hits.

And a smell? Mi mother cooking paella.

Do you think that it’s important to get away from the place where you grew up in? Based on my experience, I think it is very important. It offers you the opportunity of experimenting distance, something different, you can learn so much about yourself and, at the same time, about the world that surrounds us. There’s a lot to gain when you put yourself out there.

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You have nearly 80,000 followers on Instagram. Do they help you feel like home when you’re not? This is a very good and interesting question. I’ve never heard anyone ask or talk about Instagram from this perspective. I think, more often than not, I’ve done quite the opposite, but recently there have been some moments when “they” have helped me feel like home. When I was living in Ohio I was really active and engaged with Instagram, I found a community of people who saw my work and believed in it.

Are you the type of person who enjoys having people over, or you rather treat your home as the place where you can find some peace of mind, rest and hide from the world? I like both options and, honestly, in New York City, having a place where you can invite people over is a luxury. The apartment I’m moving to in a month has space to host friends, which is something very exciting and new to me. I think you can be both types of person!

Do you work at home or do you have a studio? Not long after I landed here, I moved into a big loft, which worked as my studio and home at the same time. It was really productive living in the place where you work at, I felt much closer to the work I was doing. Sometimes it made everything easier.

Does your house play any role in your creative process? Not particularly, although the loft where I used to live definitely did. It brought a lot of bright, bright light in to my images. There was something special about being home, taking a shower or cooking, and suddenly having an idea and being able to explore it right away. There is also a lot in my day-to-day I find inspiring, and the proximity of living and working in the same space conceived an alliance between the two of them.

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Is there any place at home, or an activity, that helps you clear your mind and come up with good ideas? I don’ feel that way about any particular place in this apartment, though the bathtub next to the window has always been a nice spot to ponder.

What’s your favorite part of the house? A tuxedo cat who I call Big D (and his accomplice, Lil P). My favorite part of my room is the morning light, the two windows and seeing the twelve o’clock kids whiz by every day.

Do you have any pieces from other artists decorating the walls of your house? Yes! It’s funny how I don’t have many photographs right now. To name a few: Emily Theobald, Isaac Nichols, Dave Singley, Dean Roper, Zachary Armstrong. I find it really important to surround yourself by pieces that move you, that inspire you. When you place an artwork on your wall, or any space in your home, you are inviting the artist to engage with you on a personal day-to-day level. Mi long-term goal is to have a large (and ever-growing) collection of art-friends!

Tell us one of the best memories you have living in this house. Using the morning light that bathes my bed as a natural alarm clock.

If there was a fire, what would you take with you? Hard drives, personal objects with sentimental importance and my tree hammock.

Do you remember the moment when you felt like, “I’m home”? I don’t know if I have ever felt that way in NYC. You rent, rent and rent some more until you decide to leave. I think New York, as a city, is more like a home to me than any apartment I’ve lived in here.

Describe to us the house where you see yourself growing older. There are so many variations of it. One is a wooden house in the countryside with a wrap-around porch. Another is a brownstone in Brooklyn. Another is a flat in Paris, with balconies, of course. Another is a house in Spain, in Barcelona or the countryside, with endless tiles and swing-out windows. I feel specially drawn into growing older somewhere in Europe.

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If you could have any piece of art for your home, which one would it be? I feel like this answer changes often, but a large-scale Matisse.

Which artist do you think it would be fun to have as a roommate? I feel like some of the greatest artists would make difficult roommates. Something tells me Vera Chytilová would be a fun roommate.

Stephen King once said, “home is where you dance with others”. In your own words, how would your definition of home be? Perhaps home is the place where you don’t think about being somewhere else.

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